Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

Church Altar and tabernacle stand – day 5

I started out today with planing down a piece of walnut to 1/8″ thick. This piece will be for the cross that will be inlaid on the door I just glued up. I have only done one or two small inlay projects before, so this should be a learning experience.

Planing down the walnut veneer

Planing down the walnut veneer

Cross pattern

Cross pattern

I applied a few pieces of carpet tape to the back of my pattern and stuck it to the walnut. I cut out the cross on the scroll saw. My bandsaw blade is way too big for intricate work.

Cutting out the cross

Cutting out the cross

Tracing the location

Tracing the location

I did manage to break the cross removing the tape, but it will all be glued in place, so I taped it back together to trace the location of the cross onto my oak veneer. I used my small trim router to cut the 1/8″ deep cross.

Routing out the cross

Routing out the cross

Cleaning up the corners

Cleaning up the corners

With a chisel, I cut out the sharp corners that my 1/4″ bit would not fit into. I also cleaned up any loose veneer on the bottom of the hole so the glue would stick better. A quick test fit showed a few places that had to be trimmed to allow the cross to fit snugly. I cleaned those up with the chisel as well. The latch I am using requires a steel slug to stick up into the veneer a bit. I removed the slug before glueing on the veneer so the router wouldn’t hit it. Now I mark the location of the slug onto the back of the cross and gouge out a small recess to receive it.

Gouging out a notch

Gouging out a notch

Glueing the cross

Glueing the cross

I applied some yellow glue to the back of the cross and pressed it into place. I clamped a board over the cross and let that dry. A few hours later, this is what it looked like:

Dried and installed

Dried and installed

Ripping new veneer

Ripping new veneer

I needed to cut more veneer to continue on with the top, so I used the same board that the center strip came from. I can get about three pieces from each 3/4″ board.

Finishing the cut

Finishing the cut

Planing the new strips

Planing the new strips

I tried to book match the grain the best I could. Unfortunately, I don’t have too many boards with matching grain patterns. I should be able to find two boards that look similar enough that it would give me six matching pieces of veneer to cover the top.

Matching up grain

Matching up grain

I installed the door in the center of the top and laid out the first three rows around it.

Dry-fitting and locating the veneer

Dry-fitting and locating the veneer

Adam decided to drop by and start on a project while I was working. I believe he is building something to go with one of his Lego sets…

Adam using the bandsaw

Adam using the bandsaw

Spreading the glue

Spreading the glue

Anyway, I spread the glue out on the veneer and laid the center strip in place. I used painter’s tape on the sides of the door panel as a spacer and to protect from glue squeeze-out. Since I have never done any veneering before, I do not have a large vacuum press. Instead, I decided to lay a board over the strip in the center and hold that down with heavy strips of wood clamped across it.

Clamping down the center strip

Clamping down the center strip

Glueing up the side strips

Glueing up the side strips

I gave those pieces an hour or two, then glued up the veneer strip on either side. I probably should have done one strip at a time, but I am impatient. I got creative and tried to get pressure evenly spaced along the strips.

Creative clamping

Creative clamping

Re-glueing a few spots

Re-glueing a few spots

Apparently I am not as good at veneering as I would like. I had a few areas that were still up in the air when I removed the clamps. Since squeezing glue in between the seams of two glued pieces is going to make a mess, I decided to try some hide glue for the repair effort. It is not supposed to stain the wood. Yellow glue can prevent the wood from taking a stain if some is dripped on the surface. (This is also the first time that I have tried hide glue, so this will be interesting.) I squeezed glue into the seams and applied some painter’s tape to the glued areas. This should prevent my clamps and cauls from sticking. After a bit more creative clamping. I moved on to the next step.

More creative clamping

More creative clamping

Impatient as ever, I started veneering the last two strips on one side. I ran out of clamps, or I may have tried to finish it.

Glueing on two more strips of veneer

Glueing on two more strips of veneer

The last thing I did before calling it a day, was to print out six more cross patterns so I can cut the rest of them out when I have an hour or two to kill. I took the time to tape them to the wood so they are ready to go.

Attaching six more cross patterns for cutting

Attaching six more cross patterns for cutting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on August 26, 2013 by in Church projects and tagged , , , , , .

Number of visitors

  • 125,701 hits

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 87 other followers

Browse by catagory

Browse my archive

%d bloggers like this: