Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

Ironing board storage cabinet – day 7

I was thinking about the door hardware that I ordered for this cabinet. The hinges require a half inch deep bore for mounting. I wanted a raised panel look, to match the sacristy cabinet drawers. I thought I might have some problems cutting into the door panel from both sides, so I made a test piece.

Test hinge installation

Test hinge installation

I was correct, the 35MM bore required to recess the hinge body came right through the face of the door.

Epic Fail!

Epic Fail!

I decided to run a 2″ wide x 5/16″ deep band around the inside of the door to thicken it.

Planing down the strips for the door

Planing down the strips for the door

I planed down some 2″ wide stock, then laid it on the door to mark the length. I also cut some short pieces to run across the top and bottom on the door panel.

Marking and cutting

Marking and cutting

 

Spreading the glue

Spreading the glue

Once cut, I spread the glue evenly along each strip, clamped it in place and Fastened it with 1/2″ long pins with my pin nailer. I made sure to locate the pins where they would not be drilled or routed.

Pin nail it in place

Pin nail it in place

With that complete, I ripped about 1/8″ off of each side of the door panel. This took the panel down to the exact size I needed and cleaned up the glue squeeze-out at the same time.

Ripping the door to actual size

Ripping the door to actual size

 

Removing a bit of insulation to have room to cut the door ends

Removing a bit of insulation to have room to cut the door ends

Next I wanted to go ahead and cut the raised panel into the face. Since my doors were a few inches too tall to cut without hitting the floor joists above, I turned my router table 90 degrees and removed some insulation from the ceiling. My 9-year old Adam called that cheating, but it worked.

Cutting the raised panel feature into the face of the door

Cutting the raised panel feature into the face of the door

 

Door cut

Door cut

While I was cutting the sides, I accidentally bumped the panel into the spinning bit and notched one corner.

Notched a corner with the bit by accident

Notched a corner with the bit by accident

It would look funny if I tried to fill it with wood filler, so I decided to cut a square pocket and insert a plug in its place.

Using the chisel to cut a square corner

Using the chisel to cut a square corner

 

New square notch cut and ready for plug

New square notch cut and ready for plug

I cut the plug about 1/16″ oversized in all directions. I then glued the three sides that would meet up to the door panel and clamped it in place. It will dry over night, and I will try to plane or chisel it down to match tomorrow. It should be barely noticeably when I am done, but I will put this corner at the bottom just to make sure…

Glueing in the oversized plug

Glueing in the oversized plug

One comment on “Ironing board storage cabinet – day 7

  1. Pingback: Ironing board storage cabinet – day 9 | Midnight woodworking

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This entry was posted on March 30, 2013 by in Church projects, furniture and tagged , , .

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