Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

Another turkey fan mount

I posted the build and the plans for this about a year ago, when I built one for a co-worker. It has, by far, been my most popular post. I had over 270 downloads of the plan. The plan was designed to be printed out full scale, on an 11″x17″ “ledger” size piece of paper. The thickness of the wood pieces are more important than the shape of the plaque, so don’t fret if you can’t print something that large, just draw your own shape.

turkey-fan-mount.PDF
My co-worker asked me to make another one, so this time I decided to refine my techniques a bit. I have learned a few tricks since the last one and I managed to build this one in about three hours.

Pile of scrap

Pile of scrap

This is a great project to make from scraps, and you can use whatever wood you like. I pulled a few scraps of walnut off the rack and planed them down to the desired thickness.

Planing this piece down to 1/2"

Planing this piece down to 1/2″

 

Cutting this one in half

Cutting this one in half

This chunk was left over from my son’s bed (8 years ago). I never throw away walnut, if looks even remotely usable… I cut it in half and joined it back together. Since it all came from the same piece, it nearly has a perfect book-matched appearance.

Glueing up the back plate

Glueing up the back plate

 

Attaching pattern with double-sided tape

Attaching pattern with double-sided tape

While the piece for the back plate dried, I applied double-sided carpet tape to the other two pieces and attached the patterns for the front and middle sections.

cutting out the middle piece

cutting out the middle piece

I cut them out on the band saw, staying just outside the line.

Cutting out the front piece

Cutting out the front piece

It is a rough cut, as you can see from the lay-up below.

Front and middle together

Front and middle together

 

Glueing and nailing the front and middle together

Glueing and nailing the front and middle together

I peeled off the patterns, then applied glue to the small, middle piece. I used 1-1/4″ brad nails to hold it in place, then match-sanded both pieces on the spindle sander.

Sanding them together

Sanding them together

Since they are now permanently attached, they match perfectly when sanded.

Edges sanded

Edges sanded

The final step for this part is a 3/8″ round-over, done face-down, on my router table.

3/8" round-over on the face

3/8″ round-over on the face

After about an hour of drying, I sliced off the glue squeeze-out while it was still pliable.

Removing the glue squeeze-out

Removing the glue squeeze-out

Next I used a card scraper to blend together the slight elevation difference caused by the wood shifting a bit, during the clamping.

Using a card scraper to blend the seam

Using a card scraper to blend the seam

 

Attaching the back plate pattern

Attaching the back plate pattern

I applied the template and cut it out, just like the other two pieces.

Back plate cut out

Back plate cut out

 

Running it along the spindle sander

Running it along the spindle sander

This one was also sanded and rounded over as well.

Finish sanding both pieces

Finish sanding both pieces

 

Drilling mounting holes

Drilling mounting holes

I centered the front piece over the back plate and marked its location. Making sure to avoid my brad nails, I marked the location of the mounting holes and drilled clearance holes for the mounting screws. I then flipped the back plate over and counter-sunk the holes.

Counter-sinking the back side

Counter-sinking the back side

I also drilled an 11/64″ hole centered on the upper back for hanging it on the wall. You may have noticed the bubble wrap. I haven’t gotten around to building a table for my drill press yet, and the bubble wrap was handy. It keeps the cast iron drill table from scratching my wood, and is doesn’t seem to cause any problems, so I have been lazy and keep using it. (I don’t know why, but I kind of like it…)

Drilling the hanger hole

Drilling the hanger hole

I clamped the front to the back together and drilled pilot holes for the wood screws.

Drilling the pilot hole through the front piece

Drilling the pilot hole through the front piece

 

Screwing the back to the front

Screwing the back to the front

After attaching both pieces with two 1-1/4″ wood screws, I hung it on one of my wall hooks to make sure it hung centered.

Everything looks centered

Everything looks centered

 

Removing pencil marks with denatured alcohol

Removing pencil marks with denatured alcohol

I pulled everything apart and removed all the pencil marks with denatured alcohol.

Applying Tung oil

Applying Tung oil

I applied three coats of Tung oil over the course of several hours and let them dry over night.

Second coat applied

Second coat applied

 

Assembled after third coat

Assembled after third coat

It will definitely build up more gloss if I added another couple of coats, but I will be giving it to my co-worker tomorrow, and he can add a few more if he desires.

2 comments on “Another turkey fan mount

  1. Jackson
    October 25, 2016

    Where do u get the blueprint of your project

  2. Lwroten
    October 25, 2016

    I created it myself. There is a link to the PDF just after the first paragraph, if you want a copy.

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