Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

Oak storage cabinet – day 7

Today the plan is to get the doors done.

Gang jointing the edges

Gang jointing the edges

I already cut the verticals for the door frame, a couple of days ago. They are a little burned on some of the edges, so I ganged them up and ran them through the planer to joint the edges.

Cutting the horizontal parts of the door frame

Cutting the horizontal parts of the door frame

Next, I cut down the horizontal frame pieces and the pieces for the panels.

Glueing up door panels

Glueing up door panels

I glued up and clamped four oversized panels.

Scraping the glue squeeze-out

Scraping the glue squeeze-out

After an hour and a half, I pulled the clamps and scraped off all of the glue squeeze-out with my 2″ wide chisel.

Planing down the full width panel

Planing down the full width panel

Once scraped, I ran the boards through the thickness planer and took them down to 5/8″ thick.

Notching the back of the panel

Notching the back of the panel

If I were doing a normal raised panel door, I would have left them 3/4″ thick, but I am trying to match some existing cabinets. This also means that none of my raised panel bits will be of use.

Notch cut

Notch cut

I will be doing all of the panel shaping on the table saw. The panel will look more like a basic mission style panel, but the cuts will all be at 90 degree angles. I cut a 1/4″ notch on the back of the panel, and a 1/4″ x 1-1/2″ notch on the front to create the raised portion.

Cutting the raised part on the front

Cutting the raised part on the front

Panels cut

Panels cut

After the panel was cut out, I set it aside and started cutting a 1/4″ wide x 3/8″ deep groove in the frame pieces to receive the panels.

1/4" groove in the vertical rails

1/4″ groove in the vertical rails

1/4" tounge on the horizontals

1/4″ tounge on the horizontals

The horizontal pieces needed a matching tenon on the ends, so I cut them out as well.

Doors dry-fit

Doors dry-fit

I did a quick dry-fit and everything went together surprisingly well…

Cleaning up the table saw cut

Cleaning up the table saw cut

Since it all fit without adjustment, I moved to cleaning up the panels. I started with the bull-nose plane, just cleaning up the table saw cuts in the corners, then I sanded down the saw marks.

Sanding the panel down

Sanding the panel down

Applying spacer foam

Applying spacer foam

Now that I am ready to assemble, I cut some 1/4″ wide x 1/8″ deep spacer foam to stick in the grooves. This will allow the panels to expand without cracking the door frame. Next, I applied glue to the tenons, and clamped it all up.

Applying glue

Applying glue

Checking for flatness

Checking for flatness

I remembered to lay a straight edge along the door to check for flatness. only one spot wanted to raise up, and I cured that with a clamp.

Doors all glued up

Doors all glued up

Doors leaned into place

Doors leaned into place

After the doors were dry, I pulled the clamps and leaned them in place. I think that is enough for one day, I will worry about hanging them another day.

One comment on “Oak storage cabinet – day 7

  1. Fr. Jason
    November 27, 2013

    Dang! You were not kidding when you said that was a tall cabinet!

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This entry was posted on November 26, 2013 by in Church projects, furniture and tagged , , .

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