Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

Rob’s sofa table – day 5

I have been busy the last couple of weeks and have not had much shop time. Rob come over last night though and we made some progress on the sofa table.

Re-sawing the drawer pieces

Re-sawing the drawer pieces

We started with the drawer sides. They need to be 1/2″ thick, so we re-sawed the 3/4″ boards that were set aside for the sides and rears of the drawers, then planed them down the rest of the way.

Planing drawer pieces to final size

Planing drawer pieces to final size

 

Cutting to length

Cutting to length

Rob cut the pieces to length, then cut the vertical grooves in the side pieces.

Cutting the vertical grooves

Cutting the vertical grooves

 

Cutting the horizontal grooves

Cutting the horizontal grooves

He then rotated the sides and cut the bottom groove. When the sides were done, Rob cut a small chamfer on the bottom, back corner of the drawers.

Cutting the relief on the back corner

Cutting the relief on the back corner

He then did a bit of planing to clean up the burn marks on the edges.

Cleaning the edges

Cleaning the edges

After the sides were done, he cut the rabbets on the drawer back pieces.

Cutting the rear drawer piece

Cutting the rear drawer piece

Bouncing around a bit, we decided to leave the drawer faces till later, and work on cutting out the drawer holes in the front apron.

Locating the holes in the front apron

Locating the holes in the front apron

I laid out the three holes to get an idea how big my routing jig would have to be.

Measuring from the bit to the edge of the base

Measuring from the bit to the edge of the base

Next, I measured the distance from my router bit to the edge of the base plate of my router. Doubling  that dimension and adding it to the hole dimension, I laid out a larger rectangle on a scrap piece of plywood.

Laying out jig dimensions

Laying out jig dimensions

 

Raising the blade through the board

Raising the blade through the board

I set the fence to match my marks, then raised the table saw blade up through the board, to cut most of the four sides. Then I hand-sawed out the corners, leaving a rectangle in the middle.

Hand-sawing the corners

Hand-sawing the corners

 

Mounting rails to the jig

Mounting rails to the jig

Placing the frame over the apron board, I attached some permanent rails to hold it centered over the area to be cut. Leaving one of the rails long allowed me to clamp the new jig into place.

Clamping the jig in place

Clamping the jig in place

 

Cutting the face holes with the router

Cutting the face holes with the router

Keeping the router tight to the edge of the jig, Rob ran the router around the frame to cut a rectangular opening. We dropped the bit down 1/4″ at a time until the plate, in the center, was cut out.

First hole cut out

First hole cut out

We then unclamped the frame and slid it down to the next one and repeated the process.

Cutting the last hole

Cutting the last hole

When we were done, we had three new drawer holes.

Holes in apron all cut out

Holes in apron all cut out

 

Drawer faces, cut 1

Drawer faces, cut 1

Moving back to the drawer faces, we carefully set the blade to do some mildly complicated grooves around the edges. The PDF attached in the first post, of this project, explains the cuts, so I will just show the steps we took.

Drawer faces, cut 2

Drawer faces, cut 2

 

Drawer faces, cut 3

Drawer faces, cut 3

 

Drawer faces, cut 4

Drawer faces, cut 4

 

Drawer faces, cut 5

Drawer faces, cut 5

We did test fits every step of the way, to make sure all the sides would fit tightly together. Loose joints would leave us with drawers that would break easily.

Dry-fitting the drawer

Dry-fitting the drawer

When we were satisfied with the fit, I took a measurement and Rob cut down the plywood for the drawer bottoms.

Cutting plywood bottoms

Cutting plywood bottoms

 

Rounding over the edges of the drawer face

Rounding over the edges of the drawer face

The last thing we did for the night was round over the drawer faces with a 1/4″ round-over bit.

Fully assembled drawer

Fully assembled drawer

The drawer joints are nice and tight because the drawers stay together without glue, well enough to test out the fit in the holes in the front apron.

Test fit in apron holes

Test fit in apron holes

Looks like we are down to clean-up and assembly. The only other piece to cut will be the top.

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This entry was posted on December 3, 2014 by in furniture and tagged , , , , , .

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