Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

Adam’s new shop stool

We made a quick project today. Adam wanted a stool to use in the shop at his work bench. We started out by coming up with a master plan that would utilize my growing pile of scrap.

The master plan

The master plan

The size of the seat was determined by the first 6″ wide piece of scrap I came across. It was about 16″ wide. I wanted the legs to angle out to give stability to the stool, so I grabbed a couple of scrap pieces that were 3/4″x3/4″ and measured across the corners to see what size holes to drill. A 1″ diameter hole was the closest. We blocked up one side of the backer board and clamped it down.

Setting up for drilling angled holes

Setting up for drilling angled holes

Then we clamped on the seat. The angle was random, but we took care to repeat it for each corner. We drilled all the way through the board.

Drilling the first hole

Drilling the first hole

Drilling the last

Drilling the last

After the holes were drilled, we determined the best height for Adam (about 21″) and cut the legs to that length.

Cutting the legs

Cutting the legs

Taking the corners off the leg ends

Taking the corners off the leg ends

Since the legs were slightly too large at the corners to fit in the new holes, Adam took a rasp to the last inch or so. We then pushed the legs through the holes to test them out. They fit fairly snug, we were happy.

Fitting the legs

Fitting the legs

Applying glue to the bottom half of the seat

Applying glue to the bottom half of the seat

The reason we drilled all the way through the seat board was because we planned to laminate a second layer onto the top.

Glueing up the seat

Glueing up the seat

Cutting the angle on the side braces

Cutting the angle on the side braces

While the glue was drying on the seat, we reassembled the legs and determined what height and angle we wanted for the lower braces. We held them about 6″ off the floor. After marking the side spacers, Adam cut them down on the bandsaw.

Cutting the seat sides flush

Cutting the seat sides flush

After an hour or so, the glue was dry enough to continue working on the seat. I cut all the sides flush on the miter saw and the table saw. Next I laid out the arc that would define the curve of the seat.

Marking the arc of the seat

Marking the arc of the seat

Cutting the curve on the bandsaw

Cutting the curve on the bandsaw

The curve was cut on the bandsaw, then sanded down with my orbital sander. I only used 80 grit paper because this is a shop stool. I don’t think we will even finish it.

Sanding the seat curve

Sanding the seat curve

Applying glue to the side supports

Applying glue to the side supports

With the seat done, I applied glue to the side supports. I set them on the 6″ spacers and spread the legs to clamp them in place.

Setting the height with a spacer block

Setting the height with a spacer block

Clamping the supports

Clamping the supports

When they were clamped, I got out my nail gun and shot a couple of 1-1/4″ brads in to hold the braces till the glue dried.

Nailing them on

Nailing them on

Nailing on the front and rear braces

Nailing on the front and rear braces

The front and rear braces came next. We spread the legs about 2″ wider than vertical in the hopes that this would prevent sway.

Marking the legs

Marking the legs

With the assembly complete, I stood the stool on my table saw and marked about 1/2″ up the legs to get a level mark all the way around. I then took my small Japanese saw and cut the marked ends off.

cutting the legs even

cutting the legs even

Testing the stool

Testing the stool

After Adam load tested the stool, I handed him my new Auriou rasp to round over the edges.

Radiusing the edge

Radiusing the edge

Adam then gave the edges a quick sanding with 100 grit paper on his sanding block.

Final sanding

Final sanding

Please keep in mind that I am only planning for about a 60 pound load. I was not expecting this quickly assembled pile of scrap to support my 200 pounds with any large amount of stability. I was surprised when I tested it and found that it didn’t move at all under my weight. I chose the square legs to go into the round holes because I knew they would be easier to keep square. The seat shouldn’t come off because of the angles of the legs, so it seems that Adam and I came up with a good design.

One comment on “Adam’s new shop stool

  1. lori strout
    July 2, 2015

    great stuff. the only thing i see as a problem is no gauntlet in the kids size. i’m glad dad is teaching shop safety.

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This entry was posted on May 27, 2013 by in From the scrap bin..., furniture and tagged , , , .

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