Midnight Woodworking

Woodworking

12′ Cherry Conference room table – day 3

Made a lot of progress on the table today. I have a lot of joinery on this table so I decided to try several different methods of creating my mortises and tenons. Today, I will be trying mostly hand tools for the joinery. It is not my strong suit, so bear with me if I screw anything up…

Taping together the verticals

Taping together the verticals

I started by pairing up the two pieces that will make up each vertical in the legs, then held them together with double-sided tape. I taped the outside surfaces together on the inside so the visible surfaces would not be damaged by tear-out.

Locating the mortise

Locating the mortise

I marked the location of the through-mortise and hogged-out a large amount of the waste material with a 3/4″ brad-point drill bit.

Hogging out the mortises

Hogging out the mortises

 

Glueing up the verticals

Glueing up the verticals

I removed the tape and flipped the boards back around and glued them up.

Verticals clamped up

Verticals clamped up

 

Squareing up the mortises

Squaring up the mortises

When the glue was dry, I used a couple of chisels and a rubber mallet to chop out the rest of the mortises as neatly as I could. I made a mock-up of the tenons that would eventually be going in the hole to test the fit.

Test fitting a mock-up tenon

Test fitting a mock-up tenon

 

Marking the next one

Marking the next one

I used the first one to mark the opening on the rest and repeated the process on the other three verticals.

All four complete

All four complete

 

Marking the notches on the upper horizontals

Marking the notches on the upper horizontals

With those complete, I moved on the top horizontal beam of the legs. I clamped the two boards together, lining up the mortise holes, then marked the notch locations.

Marking the depth of the notch

Marking the depth of the notch

I used my marking gauge to set the depth of the notch, then cut the sides of the notch by hand, with my pull saw.

Cutting the sides by hand

Cutting the sides by hand

 

Chopping out the notch with a chisel

Chopping out the notch with a chisel

I used my 1″ chisel to chop out the waste, once the sides were cut. Not really happy with the bottom of the notch, it broke away, instead of being cleanly cut. Luckily the bottom of the notch will not be seen, once the top beams are attached. I will use a different method to cut the beam notches out.

Notches complete

Notches complete

 

Marking the radius on the upper leg beam

Marking the radius on the upper leg beam

I had to get creative laying out the rounded ends of the legs. I wound up using a 6″ router base from my shop, and a small platter from the kitchen, as well as a roll of masking tape to get the different diameters that I needed.

Marking the large radius on the lower leg beam

Marking the large radius on the lower leg beam

 

Laid out

Laid out

Once I finished laying out the curves, I went to the band saw and made some relief cuts.

Making relief cuts

Making relief cuts

 

Cutting out the legs

Cutting out the legs

I really didn’t like the curve with the relief cuts. They left too much to be sanded away. I have a 1/4″ blade, so I didn’t bother with relief cuts on the rest of the curves…

I don't like the lines left behind

I don’t like the lines left behind

 

Leg parts cut out

Leg parts cut out

When the upper and lower leg components were cut out, I ran them across the spindle sander to make all the curves smooth.

Sanding all four together

Sanding all four together

 

Marking excess tenons

Marking excess tenons

I did a dry-fit of all the leg parts and marked the parts of the tenons that stuck out the bottom. I took them over to the band saw and cut off the excess.

Cutting down the tenons

Cutting down the tenons

 

Legs dry-fit

Legs dry-fit

 

Applying glue to legs

Applying glue to legs

I took everything back apart and started applying glue to all of the mating surfaces.

First leg  clamped up

First leg clamped up

I clamped up the first leg and wound up using all of my smaller clamps, so I let that one set for a few hours, then did the second one.

Second leg clamped up

Second leg clamped up

 

New Quadra-cut bit

New Quadra-cut bit

When the legs were dry, I loaded up my new router bit to round over all of the outer edges of the legs. I bought a four-bladed Quadra-cut bit for trimming up the laminate, when I do the top. I thought it would work good in this application as well.

Rounding over all the outside edges

Rounding over all the outside edges

It made a lot of chips, but it cut really smoothly and made less noise than a standard two-blade bit.

Turned out nice

Turned out nice

When I pulled the clamps on the second leg, I went ahead and clamped up the cross-bars for the bottom stretchers. I don’t need them yet, but I have a lot of glue-ups to do on this table, so I thought I would get them out of the way.

Glueing up the lower base cross-bars

Glueing up the lower base cross-bars

 

Cutting the upper beam components to length

Cutting the upper beam components to length

With the legs out of the way, I cut all the pieces for the upper beams, down to their correct lengths.

Glueing the 13" pieces to the ends

Glueing the 13″ pieces to the ends

I applied glue to the 13″ pieces that would go on the ends and clamped them to the 60″ pieces. Since I was using a bunch of my clamps elsewhere, I gang clamped all of them. It uses less clamps, but things can shift if you are not careful.

Clamp conservation...

Clamp conservation…

While they were drying I went back to the legs. I did a little touch-up sanding on the glue squeeze-out on the second leg, then rounded over all of the outside edges on that leg as well.

Cleaning up the glue squeeze-out

Cleaning up the glue squeeze-out

I spent a while sanding the legs down, working up from 80 grit to 220 grit.

Sanding the legs down

Sanding the legs down

The legs are super smooth and they look great.

Legs complete

Legs complete

 

Marking out the radius on the upper beam parts

Marking out the radius on the upper beam parts

I pulled the clamps on the beam halves and marked out the curved ends.

Cutting the radius

Cutting the radius

I repeated the cut and sand process with them while they were only 5′ long. I couldn’t swing the full 10′ long beams around the bandsaw, so I have to cut them now.

Sanding the beam ends smooth

Sanding the beam ends smooth

 

Beam ends ready for final glue-up

Beam ends ready for final glue-up

When that was done, I started applying glue to the inside surfaces.

Applying glue to upper beam components

Applying glue to upper beam components

I added in the 94″ long pieces and clamped up both beams to their full 10′ length.

Glued up beams, now 10' long

Glued up beams, now 10′ long

One of the 94″ pieces was accidentally cut about 1/16″ short so I cut a 1/16″ thick piece and glued it in the slot. When the glue dries, I will plane and sand it till you won’t be able to see it.

Added a shim to fill a gap

Added a shim to fill a gap

I made a good bit of progress today, hopefully I will be able to do a lot more of the table this weekend.

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This entry was posted on December 19, 2014 by in furniture and tagged , , , , , , .

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